Someone pitching the idea to sell radio to 65+ demo
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Thread: Someone pitching the idea to sell radio to 65+ demo

  1. #1

    Someone pitching the idea to sell radio to 65+ demo

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecRsopt306k

    A lot of financial planners, car dealers and other direct clients. Agencies: forget it.

  2. #2
    I would be very interested in a critique of this presentation by Messers Edwardo and Big A (among others who routinely shoot down efforts to sell to Boomers).
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  3. #3
    He talks about commercials as being part of programming. He's right, and that's why some advertisers aiming for that demo create program-length commercials aka infomercials. They want their messages to stand out, and in the context of typical music programming, such as oldies or classic hits, their :30 messages simply become part of the stop-set. That's why that kind of programming isn't the right environment for the messages he's talking about. The right environment is talk programming. That's where those messages will fit with the environment. That's why talk radio programming can make more money for radio than oldies.

    Imagine listening to an oldies radio station, and hearing all those great songs from your youth. All of a sudden the music stops, and commercials come on talking about funeral homes and drugs for prostate health. Talk about a rude awakening. Does that get you in the mood for buying something? Probably not.

    But the real issue here, and Holland doesn't address it at all, is that the demo he's talking about HATES commercials. They HATE being sold products. When the phone rings and it's a sales pitch, they hang up. When the music stops and commercials start, they turn off the radio. They're not influenced by advertising. They prefer self-discovery. They prefer word of mouth. They prefer to have people they trust share information with them. That process works better in talk radio than it does in music radio. And the TIME it takes to deliver that message works better in talk radio.

  4. #4

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    That is an interesting point. The audience tuned to talk radio is more prone to think an advertiser, even in a basic stopset is 'endorsing' the programming. Literally it is somewhat like the 'Halo Effect" touted by public radio. Because the listener likes the host, the advertiser must be on the program because they like the host too. The talk show commercial conveys more 'trust' than on a music station.

  5. #5
    I have never said there's anything wrong with selling boomers. Everything Holland says is correct. They have lots of disposable income, they're empty nesters with few expenses, and they're looking for ways to spend their money on things they want. All of that is great. The problem is trying to sell them stuff on the radio in music programming. It's very tough, and very expensive. For most advertisers, it's ineffective, and therefore they choose not to do it. The ads and the programming simply don't work well together.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by landtuna View Post
    I would be very interested in a critique of this presentation by Messers Edwardo and Big A (among others who routinely shoot down efforts to sell to Boomers).
    The biggest objection to the argument is that the older a consumer, the more difficult they are to sell. It takes more ads, more often, to convince the older consumer to make a purchasing decision.

    The number of ads needed to make a sales can cost more than the profit on the sale.

    In any case, in the larger markets where agency business is key to making a profit, the decision comes from higher up... the ad buyer does not determine the target. If we are dealing with a local agency and a big local account, the target is determined by management and the agency execs, and the media buyer can not change it. If the account is national, we know that significant product usage and purchasing research was done and the client dictated the target to the agency.

    So in the case of agency business, if a seller finds that there is no "over 55" in the target, there is nothing you can do.

    CBS has been working for years on the TV side to encourage not just agencies but clients to include 50-64 in they buying decisions. They have done extensive presentations at the client level where individual radio stations would have no access... and nothing much has changed.

    Radio can talk about the value of older consumers all day long, but if agencies are being told by their clients to buy 18-49 or 25-54 or even 18-34 your station that plays Chubby Checker and Jerry Lee Lewis is SOL.
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    But the real issue here, and Holland doesn't address it at all, is that the demo he's talking about HATES commercials. They HATE being sold products. When the phone rings and it's a sales pitch, they hang up. When the music stops and commercials start, they turn off the radio. They're not influenced by advertising. They prefer self-discovery. They prefer word of mouth. They prefer to have people they trust share information with them.
    Exactly. Time and experience have shown the older listener that the advertiser is often exaggerating, sometimes to the brink of lying. Fortunately, there are always younger, more gullible listeners available and they are always Madison Avenue's prime target. When today's CHR listener is 60 and listening to Taylor and Arianna on his/her storage device and wondering why he can't hear their music on radio anymore instead of whatever "garbage" the current 18-34 crowd is listening to, Big A Jr. or David Eduardo Jr. will probably be there to tell him/her why. And he/she won't believe it and argue that the radio suits are wrong. And FrankBerry Jr. will close the thread, citing circular argument ...
    Last edited by CTListener; 09-10-2016 at 04:30 PM.

  8. #8
    Mr. Holland referred to "55-70" while using famous 70 year olds as examples, thus putting them nearly out of the demo! I suppose that the only hope for "News/Talk" is for Generation X to get interested when THEY reach 55!

  9. #9
    There are stations that advertise to the demo being referred to in this thread, and they do quite well for themselves. But then they are selling something useful to the demographic instead of telling them what they should buy for someone else who should be rolling up his or her sleeves and buying it for himself/herself. But then, whatever is expedient....
    No irony there.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    But the real issue here, and Holland doesn't address it at all, is that the demo he's talking about HATES commercials. They HATE being sold products. When the phone rings and it's a sales pitch, they hang up. When the music stops and commercials start, they turn off the radio. They're not influenced by advertising. They prefer self-discovery. They prefer word of mouth. They prefer to have people they trust share information with them. That process works better in talk radio than it does in music radio. And the TIME it takes to deliver that message works better in talk radio.
    This is probably the most prejudiced comment I've seen on a message board. Much as I dislike PC terms, the best word to describe it is "ageism." To be fair, most stereotypes have some basis in fact. This one does not. It's not Baby Boomers - at least not only Baby Boomers - who use ad blocking software online. Or who buy DVRs with increasingly sophisticated ad skipping software. Or who have abandoned rusty tower radio and its stop-sets for on-demand media.

    If anything, many Baby Boomers do remember when advertising was written to be attention-getting and entertaining. Many can still sing the words to "You deserve a break today" and any number of other commercial jingles. Many can still complete the sentence "Winston tastes good like ...." And most can recall when the NAB did not allow more than three spots in a row, or more than 18 minutes of commercial time.

    I call the attention of the anti-Boomer crowd here to Zoomer Radio in Toronto (and its associated media properties) which make a healthy business out of targeting active seniors.

    There are dozens of cable channels and HD sub-channels targeting seniors and apparently doing well at it. It's radio that is hobbled by prejudice being passed off as expertise.

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