cold segues
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Thread: cold segues

  1. #1

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    cold segues

    I certainly didn't pay as much attention back then as I do now, but I don't remember stations ever using cold segues, seems there was some element of imaging between every single song, whether that was a jock break, a piece of imaging, or a jingle, and there are still plenty of stations run this way. The question is though, when and why did stations start doing this? They're not as bad as they used to be, but a few years ago, especially at night, my local Hot AC, KPLZ, would play 4 songs in a row with no imaging.

  2. #2
    KXXO still uses a lot of cold segues.

  3. #3

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    That doesn't answer the question. They've always been bland presentation wise, but I don't remember quite so many cold segues even there.

  4. #4
    I'm probably not equipped to answer the question as I have not been around the business (and or alive) nearly long enough to see how these programming choices were executed over the years. There are stations out there that elect to fade songs into the next track (which I personally would define as a style of segue other than "cold" as it usually sounds pretty flawless even without imaging). I've heard this more often on rock radio stations (like KZOK). It's definitely not as common as it used to be, though.
    Last edited by fordranger797; 07-01-2016 at 12:59 AM.

  5. #5

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    Yeah I think I know what you're talking about, and have heard KZOK do this once myself. I do kind of like it, but many stations, like KPLZ, still cold segue even without the crossfading you describe. I'm only a couple years older than you, and as I said didn't really pay attention when I was little, but it appears as if, at least in airchecks that I've heard and from what I remember, stations always used to put some sort of imaging in between songs.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by bobdavcav View Post
    Yeah I think I know what you're talking about, and have heard KZOK do this once myself. I do kind of like it, but many stations, like KPLZ, still cold segue even without the crossfading you describe. I'm only a couple years older than you, and as I said didn't really pay attention when I was little, but it appears as if, at least in airchecks that I've heard and from what I remember, stations always used to put some sort of imaging in between songs.
    Just making an educated guess here, but I would think that (on average) the type of segue that you are talking about occurred more often when stations used cart tapes. It's less involved to go from one tape to the next than to add some sort of imaging. Now that we use software (such as AudioVault), it's easy just to throw in liners between each track without the talent having to do it themselves. It does surprise me that KPLZ still operates that way if they could just as easily add some sort of imaging.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by fordranger797 View Post
    Just making an educated guess here, but I would think that (on average) the type of segue that you are talking about occurred more often when stations used cart tapes. It's less involved to go from one tape to the next than to add some sort of imaging. Now that we use software (such as AudioVault), it's easy just to throw in liners between each track without the talent having to do it themselves. It does surprise me that KPLZ still operates that way if they could just as easily add some sort of imaging.
    This is great: Two 20 year-olds discussing "the good old days"! Sorry, couldn't resist.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by fordranger797 View Post
    Just making an educated guess here, but I would think that (on average) the type of segue that you are talking about occurred more often when stations used cart tapes. It's less involved to go from one tape to the next than to add some sort of imaging. Now that we use software (such as AudioVault), it's easy just to throw in liners between each track without the talent having to do it themselves. It does surprise me that KPLZ still operates that way if they could just as easily add some sort of imaging.
    Going from one carted song to another carted song vs going between a carted song, an image cut and another carted song was very easy.

    In fact, many automation systems can run in "live assist" mode where the person in the studio can more precisely select the point they want to hit the events for the best sounding segue. In such a case, the metaphor on the digital system is a cart machine deck array. With a touch screen, they are played just like cart machines.

    In the era of all-cart operations we were in the diary ratings system. In those days, it was vital to image a station as often as possible. Most contemporary formats had a jingle or imager or jock rap between every song. Some, like the Mike Joseph Hot Hits ones, might have done song-jingle-jock-shotgun jingle-music. It was really easy to do if you had enough cart machines in the studio.
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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post

    In the era of all-cart operations we were in the diary ratings system. In those days, it was vital to image a station as often as possible.
    While giving the call letters and dial location isn't vital anymore in the PPM world, it's important to BRAND your station. That's the role imaging plays today, and why stations still run imaging between songs. You want to tie your brand to the hit songs your station plays. Today, Program Directors are called Brand Managers. Air talent can be called Brand Communicators. Their goal is not only to get you to listen to the radio station, but also visit the website, engage in social media with the talent, and attend local station events. Consistency is important in branding. Repetition is important in branding. The same tricks that worked in the diary days are being applied now for branding.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by semoochie View Post
    This is great: Two 20 year-olds discussing "the good old days"! Sorry, couldn't resist.
    Another 20 year old chiming in here... David Eduardo is correct in terms of why there were little to no cold segues in the dairy days. Today with PPM, a big goal (from what I know) is to keep everything very music intensive. One way to sweep through the music quickly (and to avoid a tune out) is adding cold segue between songs. This is also why jock breaks have become shorter.

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