The future of AM radio in Australia - Page 2
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Thread: The future of AM radio in Australia

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarioMania View Post
    So in 5 years or so, AM will be all static Australia?
    This appears to be a proposal, not a done deal. And as the article says, in many areas of Australia, AM radio is the only way to reach rural populations.
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  2. #12
    Thanks, David

    I hope somehow AM will get a revival, But I don't think it will happen

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarioMania View Post
    Thanks, David

    I hope somehow AM will get a revival, But I don't think it will happen
    In some situations, AM is still very valid.

    For example, Mexico specifically made an exemption in the national move to FM for stations in rural indigenous population zones. This particularly effects stations broadcasting in one of Mexico's over one hundred indigenous languages and dialects which have to overcome rugged terrain and sparsely distributed populations. Those stations will mostly remain on AM and represent the only situation where new AM licenses may be granted in the future.
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  4. #14
    1st Step: Get rid of IBOC on AM. It doesn't work..On FM yes, AM no

    2nd Step: Bring back AM Stereo, It's still here..But only a handful of Station are using it

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by MarioMania View Post
    1st Step: Get rid of IBOC on AM. It doesn't work..On FM yes, AM no

    2nd Step: Bring back AM Stereo, It's still here..But only a handful of Station are using it
    IBOC on AM works, but there are big consequences. The real problem is there are too many stations crowding the band. It would work better with fewer stations.

    AM stereo doesn't address the real issue, which is interference. AM stereo is lipstick on a pig. It's still a pig.

    The way to fix AM, and it was mentioned earlier, is shut down all the small directional stations. The problem is what to do with those current owners.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    IBOC on AM works, but there are big consequences. The real problem is there are too many stations crowding the band. It would work better with fewer stations.

    AM stereo doesn't address the real issue, which is interference. AM stereo is lipstick on a pig. It's still a pig.

    The way to fix AM, and it was mentioned earlier, is shut down all the small directional stations. The problem is what to do with those current owners.
    To add to that, in a place like Australia where the band is much more open, IBOC would work without creating an interference level like we see here, where stations are packed closer together. You probably remember that I am a fan of AM stereo, but one of the drawbacks I had with it was that the interference was LOUDER in stereo than in mono. It's fine in Western Canada where the lightning storms don't hurt even distant stations, but in a place like Australia, the stronger storms, coupled with today's electrical interference would make stereo listening on AM a painful experience on all but the very strongest of stations.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by radiocph View Post
    [...]
    Right now, there’s a proposal afoot, here in Australia, to convert AM stations to FM, in markets where both stations are owned by the same broadcaster. By owning two FM stations in the one market, operators would be free to migrate away from their expensive News/Talk programming on the AM band in favor of two music formats; a lot cheaper option.
    [...]

    http://www.bradsmart.com.au/#!Life-a...f228a96f14cf46
    Beyond that the government may see some political advantages to itself in doing this.
    Getting rid of AM talk would surely give them a lot less headaches (the No More Rush Limbaughs effect)

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by mimo View Post
    Maybe not in the large cities. Some AMs will remain. I heard there are some regions where AM is still preferred since those stations cover a large territory and reach many remote towns, and it might be costly to set up several FM transmitters when one AM might be more cost efficient. If someone knows the situation better than I do, I'd like to be corrected if I've made some errors.
    You are correct....
    Having lived and traveled extensively in Australia, there are many "country towns" which are served only by AM radio. Even in places with decent size populations like Hobart Tasmania, AM stations reach many more areas due to the hilly and mountainous geography.... I cannot see AM going away anytime soon.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prescott Joe View Post
    You are correct....
    Having lived and traveled extensively in Australia, there are many "country towns" which are served only by AM radio. Even in places with decent size populations like Hobart Tasmania, AM stations reach many more areas due to the hilly and mountainous geography.... I cannot see AM going away anytime soon.
    Quite right. The ABC will surely retain their capital cities' and large country town "ABC Local Radio" stations on AM, which are the primary source of news and information for large areas of the country. In addition, many of them are overall top rated stations in the cap cities, albeit with older-skewing listener bases. Sports (sorry, "sport") coverage is also very important to the regional areas.

    Where I lived in Western Australia, there were still quite a few regional AM stations playing music (mostly hits/classic hits).

  10. #20
    Most of the AM stations in big cities are available on DAB+

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