Anyone else thinks CHR music has become even more annoying?
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Thread: Anyone else thinks CHR music has become even more annoying?

  1. #1

    Anyone else thinks CHR music has become even more annoying?

    As a listener, I am someone who has an interest in pop music but today's songs are very overplayed and seemed to have gotten more intense sounding and annoying than previous years. On every CHR station the playlist is the same, who determines these hits? I cannot believe that this is the music that today's listeners like for 2015/2016. This is a small list of the ones that have been played enough and I personally tune to another station if I can:

    Stressed Out - Twentyone Pilots,
    Roses - The Chainsmokers,
    Daya - Hide Away
    Selena Gomez - Same Old Love
    Alessia Care - Here
    Bebe Rexha - Me, Myself, & I
    Meghan Trainor - Like I'm Gonna Lose You
    The Weeknd - The Hills
    Shawn Mendes - Stitches (Good but way too much overplay)
    Elle King - Exs and Ohs
    Andy Grammer - Honey I'm Good (remix is ok)
    Major Lazer - Powerful
    Taylor Swift - Bad Blood
    Imagine Dragons - Demons (older but still annoying/overplayed)

    I don't think they are very upbeat or as positive sounding as music in the 80s/90s. I don't think Sara Bareilles - She Used To Be Mine and Michael Franti - Once A Day last year got enough airplay (but I like them better). The pop music in 2012 was at least a bit decent but it's gone downhill from there. Why is CHR music becoming so intense sounding as the years go on? I am surprised that Major Lazer even made it's way onto hot AC radio. That is a rap artist so is hot AC becoming CHR now? I'd like some opinions.

  2. #2
    YES!!!! I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks this, but seemingly every post I make about this gets bashed. I wouldn't necessarily say '10s music is bad per-say, but the things that get played (and re-played as recurrents) are absolutely either horridly annoying or terribly bland--and the playlists have gotten more narrow the past few years, so we are forced to be "stuck" with several songs and artists across several formats, and more often.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by icycool7227 View Post
    As a listener, I am someone who has an interest in pop music but today's songs are very overplayed and seemed to have gotten more intense sounding and annoying than previous years. On every CHR station the playlist is the same, who determines these hits? I cannot believe that this is the music that today's listeners like for 2015/2016. .
    Overplayed? In the 60's many CHR's played the top song or songs every 90 minutes.

    Playlists the same? We are in an Internet world, where the same songs are exposed worldwide almost simultaneously. And again, back in the 60's and 70's lists were significantly the same, and the differences were due to slower information exchange more than anything else. In fact, going back several more decades, "Your Hit Parade" presented the top songs nationwide, first on radio and then on TV.

    The hits are determined by listeners. Major stations do their own "callout" research to track songs, and use all kinds of streaming and download statistics to track music.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tall_guy1 View Post
    YES!!!! I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks this, but seemingly every post I make about this gets bashed.
    If your definition of "bashed" is an explanation that music is researched, including auditorium testing with actual in-demographic listeners, and the songs that test highest are the ones that get played ... then yes, we have been "bashing" you.

    As David says, CHR has always been about playing the hits over and over and over and over. That has not changed since the days of everyone emulating the Bill Drake approach at KHJ in 1965.

    Here is what everyone who starts a thread like this one fails to understand: If you are listening for such long periods of time as to be noticing (and burning out on) the repetition, you are not following typical listener patterns. The vast majority listen for about 20 minutes at a time and then either go off and do something without radio or change to another one of their favorite stations. When we who are programmers schedule music, we use filters, play history, etc., to prevent songs repeating in the exact same 20 minute period for as many days as possible. That, combined with the standard listener behavior, means the vast majority don't hear the songs often enough to be burned out on them.

    In fact, when I was a CHR jock back in the 1980s, I was frequently told by PDs that, because we heard every play of every song on our shifts, it was expected that we would get tired of them quickly. The reality is that when the listening pattern is taken into account, the audience is just starting to become familiar with songs around the time we were "burned out" on them.

    I'm sure this next statement will also be considered "bashing" because it's the only definition that fits your perspective of the message board, but posting lists of songs you think are burned out is not going to change industry behavior, because the methodologies I describe above are proven to get the highest ratings, which means the maximum potential sales revenue for the stations. So ... however long it took you to make that list and write that post, you wasted.

    Tell me, OP: You say you "tune to another station when you can". When that station also follows the same methodologies and (in your mind) overplays the hits, what can you then do? The question is rhetorical, but what you should be considering is that if we all program in much the same way, there must be something to it.

    These are the facts of the business. They are not opinions. And they will not bend just because you say they should.

    I pray that this thread will not turn into another one like the one I described here.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by K.M. Richards View Post
    If your definition of "bashed" is an explanation that music is researched, including auditorium testing with actual in-demographic listeners, and the songs that test highest are the ones that get played ... then yes, we have been "bashing" you.

    As David says, CHR has always been about playing the hits over and over and over and over. That has not changed since the days of everyone emulating the Bill Drake approach at KHJ in 1965.

    Here is what everyone who starts a thread like this one fails to understand: If you are listening for such long periods of time as to be noticing (and burning out on) the repetition, you are not following typical listener patterns. The vast majority listen for about 20 minutes at a time and then either go off and do something without radio or change to another one of their favorite stations. When we who are programmers schedule music, we use filters, play history, etc., to prevent songs repeating in the exact same 20 minute period for as many days as possible. That, combined with the standard listener behavior, means the vast majority don't hear the songs often enough to be burned out on them.

    In fact, when I was a CHR jock back in the 1980s, I was frequently told by PDs that, because we heard every play of every song on our shifts, it was expected that we would get tired of them quickly. The reality is that when the listening pattern is taken into account, the audience is just starting to become familiar with songs around the time we were "burned out" on them.

    I'm sure this next statement will also be considered "bashing" because it's the only definition that fits your perspective of the message board, but posting lists of songs you think are burned out is not going to change industry behavior, because the methodologies I describe above are proven to get the highest ratings, which means the maximum potential sales revenue for the stations. So ... however long it took you to make that list and write that post, you wasted.

    Tell me, OP: You say you "tune to another station when you can". When that station also follows the same methodologies and (in your mind) overplays the hits, what can you then do? The question is rhetorical, but what you should be considering is that if we all program in much the same way, there must be something to it.

    These are the facts of the business. They are not opinions. And they will not bend just because you say they should.

    I pray that this thread will not turn into another one like the one I described here.
    Oh, well my intention of posting this thread certainly wasn't meant to get anyone flared up, I was asking for some general opinions. There is just so much better music out there that just isn't getting played on the radio and it seems the majority of listeners don't know what good music is anymore. In the 1980s and 1990s music was better but not today. I am not one of those listeners who think this music is ok to listen to for even 20 minutes (it gives anyone - a headache!). I'm curious to know how many listeners per day request those particular songs. I do not work in radio myself so I wouldn't know. I haven't heard one new song hit that sounds like anything done in the 80s/90s and think that's very sad. I wish today's music would have evolved to more adult contemporarish songs like Goo Goo Dolls/Sarah McLachlan types instead of Justin Bieber and Ellie Goulding.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by icycool7227 View Post
    Oh, well my intention of posting this thread certainly wasn't meant to get anyone flared up, I was asking for some general opinions. There is just so much better music out there that just isn't getting played on the radio and it seems the majority of listeners don't know what good music is anymore. In the 1980s and 1990s music was better but not today. I am not one of those listeners who think this music is ok to listen to for even 20 minutes (it gives anyone - a headache!). I'm curious to know how many listeners per day request those particular songs. I do not work in radio myself so I wouldn't know. I haven't heard one new song hit that sounds like anything done in the 80s/90s and think that's very sad. I wish today's music would have evolved to more adult contemporarish songs like Goo Goo Dolls/Sarah McLachlan types instead of Justin Bieber and Ellie Goulding.
    OK, so you're old enough to fondly remember the 80s and you still liked what was being played until recently. It sounds to me like you're getting older and since this music is no longer intended for you, you don't make a connection so you don't really like it. It's possible that some future incarnation will be more palatable to you but it just might get worse because again, this music isn't intended for you. The second possibility is that you're not female and the third is that both possibilities come into play.

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    Quote Originally Posted by icycool7227 View Post
    I wish today's music would have evolved to more adult contemporarish songs like Goo Goo Dolls/Sarah McLachlan types instead of Justin Bieber and Ellie Goulding.
    Now on that point, I agree with you wholeheartedly.

  8. #8
    The Day The Music Died happened sometime in 1984. But you all know that. You keep spinnin' the wax to keep the dollahs rollin' in. The artistry is dead.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by K.M. Richards View Post

    Tell me, OP: You say you "tune to another station when you can". When that station also follows the same methodologies and (in your mind) overplays the hits, what can you then do? The question is rhetorical, but what you should be considering is that if we all program in much the same way, there must be something to it.

    These are the facts of the business. They are not opinions. And they will not bend just because you say they should.

    I pray that this thread will not turn into another one like the one I described here.
    Every station repeats to some extent, but a station that rotates around constant songs I find annoying, I try to tolerate the station as much as I can to hear the good songs--which is subjective. However, when the playlist tightens and the good songs are pushed out, it gives me little initiative to turn back to that station. However, if songs are worked into the mix that do not get played often slid in-between spun-out hits, I usually listen to them. For example, KMXV in Kansas City when it was owned by Wilks would play a lot of gold hits during the daytime, some even going back to the '80s like "Just Like Heaven" until it was bought by Steel City. KRBZ, our alternative station, also uses that methodology during drive times, like playing alternative songs that haven't been heard for a while from the '00s in between songs that are in power rotation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by landtuna View Post
    The Day The Music Died happened sometime in 1984.
    I am more inclined to think that date is slightly different for each person as they grow more and more tired of the "music for the next generation" encroaching on what they always felt was "their" radio station.

    I didn't get truly and completely disenfranchised until somewhere around 1993.

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