Norway to end FM Radio Broadcasting - Page 2
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Thread: Norway to end FM Radio Broadcasting

  1. #11

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    http://www.theverge.com/2015/4/19/84...-fm-radio-2017

    Looks like there's a date in place now.

  2. #12

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    The End of FM

    The country of Norway just announced it is switching off FM in 2017 and going to digital broadcasting. Could the US be following their lead?

  3. #13
    Many, many pockets to be padded first.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by FRR View Post
    Could the US be following their lead?
    Radio in Norway is all government owned. Not so here. Very different situation. This is something the Norwegians have been working on for 20 years. Neither the FCC nor Congress have even begun considering it here.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Radio in Norway is all government owned. Not so here. Very different situation. This is something the Norwegians have been working on for 20 years. Neither the FCC nor Congress have even begun considering it here.
    The deeper reports indicate that a significant motivating factor for the government operators of radio service is the cost savings of being able to operate fewer transmitters with lower powers while providing the full channel array even in the smallest Norwegian towns.

    It's significant to note that this is a country of just over 5 million people... a bit bigger than the Phoenix, AZ, metro. A whole different set of logistics and much more of a "nanny state" environment as well.
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  6. #16
    Maybe some of those cost savings can be used to engage a pressure washer for the every square inch of Oslo that for the past 20 years has become a graffiti jungle. First they should translate it all so that they know what is going on in their little country. They can report it all on their new digital radio stations.
    No irony there.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post

    It's significant to note that this is a country of just over 5 million people... a bit bigger than the Phoenix, AZ, metro. A whole different set of logistics and much more of a "nanny state" environment as well.
    And, interestingly, one of the most researched "happy" countries in the world.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by landtuna View Post

    And, interestingly, one of the most researched "happy" countries in the world.
    Also one of the places where certain drugs are legal.

  9. #19
    Norway probably has the highest standard of living in the world right now. Well run country.

    They have several popular commercial radio stations, some of which have FM frequencies in every major city, so although the government there controls the FM channels (like the FCC and it's Canadian counterpart control frequency allocations here), there is privately owned and operated radio there.

    The last I read, the Norwegian government may still allow for private, commercial FM radio and local radio on FM after the switchover.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by boombox4 View Post
    Norway probably has the highest standard of living in the world right now. Well run country.

    They have several popular commercial radio stations, some of which have FM frequencies in every major city, so although the government there controls the FM channels (like the FCC and it's Canadian counterpart control frequency allocations here), there is privately owned and operated radio there.

    The last I read, the Norwegian government may still allow for private, commercial FM radio and local radio on FM after the switchover.
    All the local (not national) stations outside of the three or four largest cities will be left on FM. That is over 200 stations.

    The government, in a manner similar to the BBC, operates a number of national radio services. There are some national private stations. All of these will go to DAB.

    This is not a large country. In area, it is about 15% smaller than California and in population it has just 15% of the population California. The total population is about that of the Phoenix, AZ, MSA.

    Additional reports indicated that less than 25% of Norwegians have DAB radios at present and the entities pushing for a digital conversion are all involved closely with the new systems, and their manufacture and installation. The listener has not been consulted.

    Norway, outside of a couple of Emirates, has the highers per-capita production of petroleum in the world. This accounts for the average per-capita income being in the top 10 world wide and finances Nordic style welfare state.
    Last edited by DavidEduardo; 05-02-2015 at 12:43 PM.
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