60's Music Gone From WCBS-FM - Page 3
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Thread: 60's Music Gone From WCBS-FM

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by wadio View Post
    I was actually speaking more generally, responding to a post that wasn't strictly about CBS-FM. But you're right. From what I hear CBS-FM has been billing great. With the 60's music. ;-)
    But if they want to keep the 25-54 ratings at the current level, and to retain billings, they have to regularly adjust the music to keep their audience from becoming older as the music ages. That means occasionally purging the older stuff that the younger side of the station's target do not particularly like.
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  2. #22
    They shouldn't be purging the 60s music at all. It's bad enough their ratings will do a B.D. (BIG DROP) after that.. Make the age demo open and see what happens.

    Maybe they should put a 40-50-60s oldies on a subchannel...<But would that bring an audience?? Hmm.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BJSteigner View Post
    They shouldn't be purging the 60s music at all. It's bad enough their ratings will do a B.D. (BIG DROP) after that.. Make the age demo open and see what happens.
    The reason why stations like CBS.FM focus on 35-54 as a target is that an "open demo" does not work for sales. There is essentially no revenue for the 55+ sector, so CBS has to keep from becoming a "seniors' station" by pruning the really old stuff once it no longer tests against the 35-54 core.

    CBS-FM could drop all its 55 and over listeners and it would not affect revenues at all.
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  4. #24
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    In Los Angeles, KRTH---another CBS station---has dropped almost all the 1960s hits. They still play a few by Aretha Franklin, Beatles, Rolling Stones, Doors, Creedence Clearwater Revival.....and that fershlugginer Brown Eyed Girl which has been played at least ten million times. Ugh! KRTH also added more 1980s hits and a few from the early '90s. The emphasis is on '70s-80s and the regular playlist was cut to a measly 400 songs and, in the most recent Nielsen Audio ratings, KRTH was the most-listened-to station for the first time in its 44-year history. Go figure! Now.....who at 'CBS-FM is trying to copy KRTH?

  5. #25
    The reason why stations like CBS.FM focus on 35-54 as a target is that an "open demo" does not work for sales.
    "Focusing" on the 35-54 demo is all well and good, but suppose the focusing mechanism is out of focus? Suppose the 35-54 year olds just "like" certain songs without regard to what era they came from. Suppose they like certain songs because they aren't played to death based on the charts? Just suppose.

    To quote our board moderator (and this is a very important statement, IMO):

    Remember: that statistics and studies are also often wrong, or at least varied in accuracy. Statistics can sometimes be construed to support either side of an argument. Sometimes studies don't account for "something" that changes the outcome. For example: Asbestos used to be deemed safe until it was discovered not safe (I think they forgot to ask, "safe for what?"). And scientists thought the world was flat, until is was discovered to be round. The same can be thought for anything and everything we know and believe to be true today, right here, right now.
    Suppose there's one important ingredient that doesn't show up in today's "the world is flat" thinking? What then?

    I was in a supermarket this very afternoon where I noticed that all the music was from the '60s and 70's. At the checkout, the fellow who checked us out (I'm guessing he was in his late 20's) was unusually upbeat and friendly. As we were leaving I heard a co-worker ask him, "What are you smiling about?" His reply, "I love this song ... it's really corny but I like it!" (Honest, I didn't make this up.)

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by wadio View Post

    Suppose there's one important ingredient that doesn't show up in today's "the world is flat" thinking? What then?
    That's why you do research. Constantly do research. And when you're not doing research yourself, you ask others in the business who are also doing research what they see. Over and over again. Constantly. You have one story about one person in his late 20s. We have thousands and thousands of them. Because we don't program to individuals. We program to the masses. To do that, we need CONSENSUS. So there's no "suppose" in our vocabulary. If you're guessing, you get fired.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by wadio View Post
    "Focusing" on the 35-54 demo is all well and good, but suppose the focusing mechanism is out of focus? Suppose the 35-54 year olds just "like" certain songs without regard to what era they came from. Suppose they like certain songs because they aren't played to death based on the charts? Just suppose.
    That is why each time a station tests music they test hundreds of songs that they are not playing just in case.

    I was in a supermarket this very afternoon where I noticed that all the music was from the '60s and 70's. At the checkout, the fellow who checked us out (I'm guessing he was in his late 20's) was unusually upbeat and friendly. As we were leaving I heard a co-worker ask him, "What are you smiling about?" His reply, "I love this song ... it's really corny but I like it!" (Honest, I didn't make this up.)
    And it is very likely all those songs were tested recently, but with the question "how much would you like to hear this song on the radio today?" What people like to hear in the background at restaurants and in clubs and stores is not necessarily what they want to hear on their favorite radio station.
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  8. #28
    Remember: that statistics and studies are also often wrong, or at least varied in accuracy. Statistics can sometimes be construed to support either side of an argument. Sometimes studies don't account for "something" that changes the outcome. For example: Asbestos used to be deemed safe until it was discovered not safe (I think they forgot to ask, "safe for what?"). And scientists thought the world was flat, until is was discovered to be round. The same can be thought for anything and everything we know and believe to be true today, right here, right now.
    What more can I say?

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by wadio View Post
    What more can I say?
    You could try using a different kind of example or metaphor. The two you quoted are totally inappropriate.

    The shape of the world and the properties of asbestos are scientific fact. That at one time those facts were not yet discovered did not change the facts.

    In researching music, we are not doing scientific research. We are doing behavioural research... finding out likes and dislikes by groups of people.

    If you pick a group of people who use your station or might use it and ask, one by one, how they like individual songs, you discover whether you should play them or not. Simple. And about taste, not science.
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  10. #30
    What are you saying, research isn't scientific? Whatever the object of proof, the method is to gather statistics, then use them as a model to project into the future. Sometimes the model works, sometimes it doesn't. A small deviation in the research can send the model into a large deviation (error) farther out along the timeline.

    What I find interesting about those who like to argue statistics is that they are NEVER WRONG! Or at least never in doubt. And of course they have the numbers to back themselves up. ;-)

    So there's no "suppose" in our vocabulary. If you're guessing, you get fired.
    And that's the truth! It's no longer possible to "suppose," you just have to "accept." And radio is no longer a growth industry.

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