College stations sold or leased to NPR, religious etc - Page 2
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Thread: College stations sold or leased to NPR, religious etc

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Goat Rodeo Cowboy View Post
    What is the typical job assignment for a broadcaster's first year in the business today?

    Does anyone do a live Talk Radio gig their first or even second year in the business?
    As I said in another thread, there are a lot more jobs OFF the air than ON the air. One of those jobs is as a talk show producer. There sometimes is a call screener. Some shows are big enough to have guest bookers. Then there's the always reliable job of board operator. Those are just a few of the jobs one might expect early in a radio career. Of course you also have entry level sales jobs, where a candidate spends all day cold-calling potential advertising clients. Not a lot of glamor there, but it's a way to get started. Most of those jobs are not likely to be taught at a typical liberal arts college, or obtainable by working at a college radio station. But it's not unusual for an NPR station that does some local programming to need at least one or two of those positions.

  2. #12

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    OK but due to GOVERNMENT RADIO hogging all the 50KW frequencies even that is not an option in most cities in America anymore.....the blame must be put on the FCC for allowing Government approved radio on those frequencies. Heck some states have double and triple coverage 2 or 3 networks you can pick up on your radio..Theft from the public to use the public airwaves.

    And public stations Hates the public.. no one can provide any content...unless its government approved

    So, Yes I do approve of community radio at least 1 in every city and not just lpfm....You can use full time 1 kw+ AM stations too..(NO dropping down to 27 watts at nighttime) ..as long as we GET THE PUBLIC INVOLVED......there is talent out there to fill 12 hours a day in most even rural towns.....

    And dont forget STUDENTS pay for their college radio station in their activity fees...and lots choose that college for that reason.

    Richard: I don't oppose student radio stations, per se. I oppose using Class B or A FM allocations for them. LPFM is fine and that's what many schools use.
    Last edited by Richard Stefan; 07-29-2014 at 07:41 PM.

  3. #13
    So "government radio" is a big pain in your keister, but the organizations that get a tax exemption and run the same religious national format on multiple signals (far more of them than NPR affiliates) don't count in your assessment here?

    I'd also like to know what "government approval" is being given to the classical on WCRB, the adult alternative on WXPN and KCRW, the locally hosted specialty shows on many NPR affiliates like KAXE, etc. You're posting utter nonsense.

  4. #14
    FredLeonard
    Guest
    Don't forget, Richard, most student radio stations are operated by government educational institutions - public schools and state-supported colleges and universities.

    And public stations Hates the public.. no one can provide any content...unless its government approved .
    Bull!

    Yes I do approve of community radio at least 1 in every city and not just lpfm.
    Right! That worked so well for cable access and for Pacifica. Let's let everybody play radio, not just students. Radio is so easy. Anybody can come in off the street and do a radio show.

    Keep in mind, radio is done for the listener, not for anybody who thinks he wants to go on the radio.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Stefan View Post

    And public stations Hates the public.. no one can provide any content...unless its government approved
    What are you talking about? The government doesn't approve anything that's aired on public radio. Quit making up crap.

    Public radio stations are not "government radio." A lot of them are owned by community non-profits or private colleges.



    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Stefan View Post
    And dont forget STUDENTS pay for their college radio station in their activity fees...and lots choose that college for that reason.
    Actually that's a major reason why so many colleges and universities are getting rid of their radio stations. The entire student body pays for an activity that only a handful of students participate in. That's not an efficient use of activity money. They're better off spending that money on something more students will use.

  6. #16
    FredLeonard
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Actually that's a major reason why so many colleges and universities are getting rid of their radio stations. The entire student body pays for an activity that only a handful of students participate in. That's not an efficient use of activity money. They're better off spending that money on something more students will use.
    I quoted this because maybe some people need to read it twice.

    PS: Not so sure about most public radio stations owned by non-profits or private colleges. A good many are owned by state-supported colleges and universities or public community colleges and some by independent government agencies. If those stations don't account for most of the stations, they do account for most of public radio's audience.

  7. #17
    I wasn't aware "government agencies" owned broadcast licenses. I know there were some exceptions for emergency communications, some LPFMs and TIS signals, but full power NCEs can only be owned by non profits and educational groups.

  8. #18
    FredLeonard
    Guest
    Off the top of my head, Georgia Public Broadcasting is owned by a state agency. NJ Public Broadcasting was until recently. Until the financial crisis, the City of New York operated WNYC and WNYC-FM.

    There are several state networks not part of universities.

    I'm sure people can offer other examples.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by FredLeonard View Post

    PS: Not so sure about most public radio stations owned by non-profits or private colleges.
    I changed the word "most" to "a lot." WAMU Washington and WBUR Boston are owned by private colleges. WETA Washington and WGBH Boston are owned by non-profit community groups. Same with WNYC. A community group just bought WBFO from University of Buffalo. There are a lot of them. At the same time, there's a movement by mostly Republican governors to end state-supported public broadcasting agencies. That's what happened in New Jersey. I hear that's going on in South Carolina.

  10. #20
    For schools that have a Broadcast and related Majors programs, the FM station is not a toy or simply an extra-curricular activity. It is an integral part of the experiential learning process. When done well, the public benefits by having an alternative station that stands on its own. What we don't need is a non-commercial band made up of mostly the same NPR network programs that are already well represented nationwide.

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