College stations sold or leased to NPR, religious etc
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Thread: College stations sold or leased to NPR, religious etc

  1. #1

    College stations sold or leased to NPR, religious etc

    http://online.wsj.com/articles/colle...ncy-1406567173

    >>The transition hasn't come without a fight. GSU students, alumni and supporters lit up Twitter to protest the deal. R.E.M., which has a huge social-media following, posted on Facebook and Twitter: "Big Money and power politics closes down a vital student radio station that helped launched [sic] R.E.M. and a host of others #saveWRAS."

    (Colleges selling or leasing their stations to NPR--to air news, classical, etc.--or religious organizations etc)

    >>Often, public-radio stations that already host an all-news signal want a second signal to play classical or jazz music to appeal to their target audiences, as music and news generally don't coexist well on one signal.

  2. #2
    FredLeonard
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by raccoonradio View Post
    http://online.wsj.com/articles/colle...ncy-1406567173

    >>The transition hasn't come without a fight. GSU students, alumni and supporters lit up Twitter to protest the deal. R.E.M., which has a huge social-media following, posted on Facebook and Twitter: "Big Money and power politics closes down a vital student radio station that helped launched [sic] R.E.M. and a host of others … #saveWRAS."

    (Colleges selling or leasing their stations to NPR--to air news, classical, etc.--or religious organizations etc)

    >>Often, public-radio stations that already host an all-news signal want a second signal to play classical or jazz music to appeal to their target audiences, as music and news generally don't coexist well on one signal.
    NPR does not "lease" stations. Never has. First, stations must qualify as public radio stations. Then stations can become members of NPR and get to buy programming from NPR and vote for their board of directors.

    Many educational institutions have decided to convert student radio stations to public radio stations. Usually, students end up with an LPFM instead.

    Georgia Public Broadcasting and Georgia State are part of the Georgia state government. NPR is not involved.

    Student radio stations are a toy for students to play with and a waste of institutional resources. They offer no educational benefit and do not serve the public interest, convenience and necessity.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by FredLeonard View Post
    NPR does not "lease" stations. Never has.
    To clarify, NPR does not own stations. My understanding is that NPR is prohibited by law from owning stations.

  4. #4

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    Fred Now you pisssed me off.....Student run stations are the lifeblood of potential new talent.....how do you learn...by being live on the air which means an OTA signal.....all of you poo pooed me over calling an internet station "radio".....and yet you let the main reason why some pick that college because they have a radio or tv station to train on........

    wendy Williams...and from 1982 to 1986, she attended Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, where she graduated[3] with a B.A. in communications and was a DJ for the college radio station WRBB.

    I propose the opposite we should demand NPR order its stations to give back its licenses or lower the power 50-75% for perpetrating a FRAUD on the American public by calling itself a public radio station..........the public is FORBIDDEN to volunteer or create programs at a public radio station unless they need you to man the phones at fundraising time....I think Public radio is a disgrace and a waste of airspace.....

    They hogged up all the 50-100kw stations in the 60's and 70's leaving many schools colleges and the community with no where to turn.......Imagine spending $100,000 on a communications degree and your only broadcast experience is on carrier current..shameful....

    I loath public radio stations and would rip their licenses off the wall if i was in charge...they are evil.........what do i propose hey what about the public having a radio station or 2 in each city the talent that is out there with no venue to expose it..........and all of you poo poo internet radio........well Local NPR stations steal the frequencies and run syndicated programming, no different then Clear Channel....

    ==========
    Student radio stations are a toy for students to play with and a waste of institutional resources. They offer no educational benefit and do not serve the public interest, convenience and necessity.
    Last edited by Richard Stefan; 07-29-2014 at 01:00 AM.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Stefan View Post
    the public is FORBIDDEN to volunteer or create programs at a public radio station unless they need you to man the phones at fundraising time....I think Public radio is a disgrace and a waste of airspace.....
    That's not true at all. One of the best examples of a member of the public showing up and getting a program is Garrison Keillor. He had no experience at all when he started with Minnesota Public Radio in 1969. Lots of other people just walk in the door. There are literally thousands of people who have heard public radio programming, and have been inspired to do radio. Just do it. It's not that hard. The public radio system is set up to encourage and train those people, and give them the platform to distribute their shows. One of those people was Ira Glass who ended up with an extremely popular show.

  6. #6
    FredLeonard
    Guest
    Richard: I don't oppose student radio stations, per se. I oppose using Class B or A FM allocations for them. LPFM is fine and that's what many schools use.

    BigA is correct: Many volunteers from the "public" have gotten their feet in the door at public radio stations and gone on to significant careers in public radio. This includes students who gain some experience at LPFM student stations (and back in the day, carrier current student stations) and then move up to the university-owned public radio station.

    What's your idea of a "community station?" What you describe sounds like Pacifica. Or maybe those public access cable channels. No, thanks. You hate public radio. OK, we get it. Check the ratings. Not everyone hates it.

  7. #7
    Richard Stefan, AMEN! PREACH ON! I too despise "public" radio. Their lobbying the F.C.C. to stop licensing Class D stations in 1978 is disgraceful. Student radio is NOT a toy! It's an educational extension with actual real world experience! Taking transmitter readings, proper identification, learning FCC regulations, etc.. All of which we (WFCF being my alma mater) use in the real world of broadcasting.

    As for Garrison Keillor, Wikipedia doesn't list it, but he was on U of M's campus stationWMMR from 1960-61 & then 5,000-watt 770/KUOM from 1963-68 [http://books.google.com/books?id=23y...0KUOM&f=false].

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by N1WVQ View Post
    It's an educational extension with actual real world experience! Taking transmitter readings, proper identification, learning FCC regulations, etc.. All of which we (WFCF being my alma mater) use in the real world of broadcasting.
    Almost all radio stations today have automated systems that take transmitter readings. They're far more accurate than the human system. With the elimination of the 3rd class license, most operators aren't taught FCC regulations. THAT is the real world of broadcasting.

  9. #9
    FredLeonard
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by N1WVQ View Post
    Richard Stefan, AMEN! PREACH ON! I too despise "public" radio. Their lobbying the F.C.C. to stop licensing Class D stations in 1978 is disgraceful. Student radio is NOT a toy! It's an educational extension with actual real world experience! Taking transmitter readings, proper identification, learning FCC regulations, etc.. All of which we (WFCF being my alma mater) use in the real world of broadcasting.

    As for Garrison Keillor, Wikipedia doesn't list it, but he was on U of M's campus stationWMMR from 1960-61 & then 5,000-watt 770/KUOM from 1963-68.
    Taking transmitter readings is hardly a college-level academic activity.

    WMMR was a carrier current station. LPFM is just fine for any "learning opportunities" student radio may offer. So if AM for that matter, since most of the audience has stopped listening. There is no need to waste Class B and A FM licenses on stations hardly anybody listens to (including other students). There just isn't enough room in the non-commercial band for student hobby stations.

    Broadcasting is a vocational major and out of place in a true liberal arts or science undergraduate program. Even as a vocational program, what's the value in young people running up huge debt to prepare themselves for careers in an industry about to become obsolete?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by FredLeonard View Post

    Taking transmitter readings is hardly a college-level academic activity.

    WMMR was a carrier current station. LPFM is just fine for any "learning opportunities" student radio may offer.
    This is an interesting thread to follow and try to picture what is going through the mind of each participant as they speak.... err.. WRITE their mind.

    This is NOT 1956.... when radio stations from the smallest little rural market on up to the major markets had a certain amount of uniformity: an announcer sitting in a studio... looking through a big double or tripple pane window... sitting between two or three big 16 inch turntables and talking into an RCA 44BX ribbon mic, grabbing a clip-board every 30 minutes to read and record the meters on the front of the big transmitter and thinking: What can I say the next time I click the mic on that will wow the audience.

    My first day in the business, I showed up for work at 6 A.M. and the co-owner of the station gave me a key to the building, we went in, fired up the transmitter, and he "baby-sat" me for two or three hours. And then he wandered on to do whatever station owner/managers do when they are not in the studio.

    I was up and running. Lousy way to break into something that is supposed to be so magnificent!

    So what kind of task can today's entry level broadcaster expect on his/her first day, first week, first year in the business? Spend your day loading content into the automation machine? Serve as the call-screener for a second rate talk show host?

    Who get's to react and interact with an audience where their ability to deal with a live audience has anything to do with their performance their first year in the business?

    What is the typical job assignment for a broadcaster's first year in the business today?

    Does anyone do a live Talk Radio gig their first or even second year in the business?
    Life is too short to waste time dancing with ugly posts

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