the Alternative genre seems to forget its heritage - Page 2
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Thread: the Alternative genre seems to forget its heritage

  1. #11
    DDragon
    Guest
    They don't wanna play new songs from most 90's acts. They wanna cater to the 18-25 demo which is their right I guess.

  2. #12
    I am a few months behind looking at Billboard magazine, but in one I saw yesterday they had an article which I haven't read yet but probably will online (actually reading the real magazine would have taken too long).

    Alternative once meant grunge and louder music, but the format is evolving and sounds more like it did when it began back in the days before Nirvana.

  3. #13
    Avid Listener
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by vchimpanzee View Post
    I am a few months behind looking at Billboard magazine, but in one I saw yesterday they had an article which I haven't read yet but probably will online (actually reading the real magazine would have taken too long).

    Alternative once meant grunge and louder music, but the format is evolving and sounds more like it did when it began back in the days before Nirvana.
    Actually, "Alternative" is nothing more than one of many passing fads in rock music. Attempting to keep "Alternative" alive as if it was something special and unique is ridiculous. It is not a whole new genre of music, discrete and separate from any other genre. Alternative was to the early 90's what Punk was to the late 70's - nothing more than a slightly new trend. In that regard, Punk was to the late 70's what Psychedelic was to the mid 60's. Trends in rock come and go all the time, that's the nature of rock music. The sooner everyone accepts that Alternative was just another speed bump on the rock road and moves on, the better it will be to all.

  4. #14
    Here's the article I saw:

    http://www.billboard.com/biz/article...es-full-circle

    It requires a subscription, but at a library using their service I can see it.

  5. #15
    Avid Listener
    Guest
    Can anyone explain, in their own words, what makes "Alternative" different from any other type of music? Can anyone post a clear and unambiguous description, in their own words, that everyone would agree with and understand? I'm talking about a definition clear enough that anyone read the definition, and then heard a few different songs, they could identify which songs were Alternative and which ones weren't?

  6. #16
    Not really. The article I linked to but could access at a library said that with Top 40 in trouble, guitar rock mixed with Generation X attitude and classic sounds. That was the Nirvana/Pearl Jam era. Then there were bands that did 70s style punk but had the guitars that made them appeal to fratboys. Radio stations knew better than to play Depeche Mode and the Smiths if they wanted listeners. Pop-style acts were leaving for modern AC. The former fans of alternative weren't happy with grunge and had to settle for "cerebral" Rage Against the Machine and System of a Down. Active and alternative were quite similar based on Billboard's charts. Guns 'n Roses and Metallica were showing up both places. By 2003, the White Stripes made alternative other than guitar music acceptable again. Once Sirius offered competition, alternative and active had to sound different. Even dance music is showing up in alternative now. AAA is as similar to today's alternative as active used to be.

    There's not a nice neat definition there.

  7. #17
    Avid Listener
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by vchimpanzee View Post
    Not really. The article I linked to but could access at a library said that with Top 40 in trouble, guitar rock mixed with Generation X attitude and classic sounds. That was the Nirvana/Pearl Jam era. Then there were bands that did 70s style punk but had the guitars that made them appeal to fratboys. Radio stations knew better than to play Depeche Mode and the Smiths if they wanted listeners. Pop-style acts were leaving for modern AC. The former fans of alternative weren't happy with grunge and had to settle for "cerebral" Rage Against the Machine and System of a Down. Active and alternative were quite similar based on Billboard's charts. Guns 'n Roses and Metallica were showing up both places. By 2003, the White Stripes made alternative other than guitar music acceptable again. Once Sirius offered competition, alternative and active had to sound different. Even dance music is showing up in alternative now. AAA is as similar to today's alternative as active used to be.

    There's not a nice neat definition there.
    No, but it proves the point that "Alternative" is not a separate genre of music, and is not really a music radio format either.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Avid Listener View Post
    No, but it proves the point that "Alternative" is not a separate genre of music, and is not really a music radio format either.
    Except that there is a radio airplay chart that monitors airplay of songs classified as "Alternative."

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/m...harts/1635101/

    Granted, that is sort of an ad hoc definition, as befits the format name. But the radio format is anything that stations classify as Alternative.

  9. #19
    Over the weekend I saw the movie "Cold Mountain". There was a group playing music similar to what we now call bluegrass, which falls under American and AAA. One of them was a fiddle player who was so young I concluded he must be an actual alternative musician, by radio's definition. I didn't know who he might be but I just guessed Jack White. In fact, Jack White played the role and he was listed as a musician on several of the songs. That was some good music.

  10. #20
    Avid Listener
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Except that there is a radio airplay chart that monitors airplay of songs classified as "Alternative."

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/m...harts/1635101/

    Granted, that is sort of an ad hoc definition, as befits the format name. But the radio format is anything that stations classify as Alternative.
    Do you understand the difference between a radio format and a music genre? Can you answer this simple question about Alternative as a musical genre?

    Can anyone explain, in their own words, what makes "Alternative" different from any other type of music? Can anyone post a clear and unambiguous description, in their own words, that everyone would agree with and understand? I'm talking about a definition clear enough that anyone read the definition, and then heard a few different songs, they could identify which songs were Alternative and which ones weren't?

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