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Thread: Radio & TV in Cuba

  1. #11
    B Lewis
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    Re: Radio & TV in Cuba

    I was going to mention Radio Taino as an FM-only network. Back in the day...the late 80's, during the 'radio war' between The US's Radio Marti and high powered AM Cuban stations, Taino was on 1180 and branded itself as "La Turemisora de Cuba" (Cuba's Tourist Station) with a music intense format, mixed with tourist information in Spanish. I do remember a "Legal ID' in Spanish and English. This would have been around 1988ish.

    I also hear Radio Enciclopedia on 530 AM most nights with Easy Listening (mostly instrumental) music.

  2. #12
    nocomradio
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    Re: Radio & TV in Cuba

    The OP mentioned that they heard American music being played at one point. Anything I have heard from Cuba never did that. Is that something new? Or perhaps an American station broadcasting Cuban programming? Seems that the Cuban authorities would have a hard time with American pop music on their airwaves. I'd think......

  3. #13

    Re: Radio & TV in Cuba

    I think Cuba has eased up on its anti-American slant, at least as far as radio is concerned. Just judging from my limited Spanish, coverage of U.S. news sounded pretty much like wire copy stuff to me on Radio Reloj. All the stories have to be under a minute anyway. Not much time for commentary. I can't speak for talk and opinion shows.

    And yes, I heard both Springsteen and Madonna mixed with Spanish pop one afternoon on a distant AM station. I'm quite sure it was a Cuban station. There are no other Spanish-speaking countries near the Florida Keys and certainly no U.S. AM Spanish station is going to be playing Springsteen and Madonna.


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  4. #14
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    Re: Radio & TV in Cuba

    Quote Originally Posted by nocomradio
    The OP mentioned that they heard American music being played at one point. Anything I have heard from Cuba never did that. Is that something new? Or perhaps an American station broadcasting Cuban programming? Seems that the Cuban authorities would have a hard time with American pop music on their airwaves. I'd think......
    English language music has been played for some time on the pop / AC stations... but those tended to be the lower powered ones in larger cities.

    Of course, they call it "Anglo" music, not American music... as salsa and the more traditional Latin American music is what is called "American" in Cuba.

    Of course, a number of the Cuban-American stations in Miami play a lot of music in English, as do pop station all over Latin America... but generally not AMs
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  5. #15
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    Re: Radio & TV in Cuba

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg
    I think Cuba has eased up on its anti-American slant, at least as far as radio is concerned. Just judging from my limited Spanish, coverage of U.S. news sounded pretty much like wire copy stuff to me on Radio Reloj. All the stories have to be under a minute anyway. Not much time for commentary. I can't speak for talk and opinion shows.
    Funny coincidence... I'm doing an evaluation of news in and for Cuba right now and while I have seen a gradual improvement of formatics, I don't see any change in content. The news is very slanted, just as all the Prensa Latina copy has always been. It's certainly filled with the keywords like "imperialist" and such, but the more strident stuff is gone. The comparisons of the Occupy movement with the Cuban Revolution have been quite virulent, in fact... addressing the imminent uprising of the masses and full of references to throwing off of chains, yokes and such. It's Pure Fidel (tm) spiced with the current Chavez-flavored condiment.
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  6. #16
    cd637299
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    Re: Radio & TV in Cuba

    Also, although my espanol is limited, I do not necessarily believe that all stories must be under a minute. Sometimes right before the time signal, one hears "continua" or "continuara' ", which would lead me to believe that more is to come on the same story after the time check.

    David, if you are doing research, do ya think maybe you could sample 30 minutes of Reloj and give us a simple summary? That would be interesting, I'd think.

    cd

  7. #17

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    Re: Radio & TV in Cuba

    Quote Originally Posted by cd637299
    David, if you are doing research, do ya think maybe you could sample 30 minutes of Reloj and give us a simple summary? That would be interesting, I'd think.

    cd
    Smart idea! I'd love to read that as well...as a person who lived in South Florida for sometime, mentioning anything not negative about post-revolution Cuba is about as taboo as saying anything positive about Nazism to a crowded Isreali temple! Direct Cuban immigrants down there (who honestly haven't touched Cuban media in over 30-50 years) assume Satan himself runs these stations and yearn for the days of the old CMQ, etc., etc. Not saying by any means that they're my go-to source for unbiased news but I do hear far more extremist views on both sides from Pacifica Radio and/or Fox News.

    And a point about Cuban radio: certain stations such as Radio Enciclopedia's 530 AM come in to South Florida quite well even during the day. I have NEVER heard a Cuba FM in the Miami/Ft. Lauderdale area. I have picked up a crystal-clear Radio Enciclopedia with RDS from Habana on 94.1...in South Carolina!

    I should point out that most major Cuban networks do stream on the internet, for those who are curious and can't pick up the networks on the radio. Depending on the station, stream quality ranges from 20kbps that constantly drops out to a very good Radio Reloj stream. Kind of ironic considering Cuba has some of the lowest percentages of internet users in the world.

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  8. #18
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    Re: Radio & TV in Cuba

    Quote Originally Posted by radiodxrichmond

    Smart idea! I'd love to read that as well...as a person who lived in South Florida for sometime, mentioning anything not negative about post-revolution Cuba is about as taboo as saying anything positive about Nazism to a crowded Isreali temple!
    Anecdote time.

    When I consulted WQBA around 1970, and later when I managed WHTT in 80-82 we had lists of euphemisms for Fidel Castro, as mentioning him by name was not considered good form.

    Among the (translated) substitutes for his name were things like The Traitor of the Americasl The Assassin of Cuba, and The Hangman. In all, there were like a dozen that rotated in use.

    And music that was playable one day might all be pulled the next if the artist did a concert in Cuba or said something nice about Fidel.

    Of course, since I knew people whose parents had been killed in front of their eyes when they were still children by the Castro henchmen, I was pretty understanding towards the strong feelings. In fact, one of my news people had spent time in the horrible prison, Combinado del Este, where dissidents were sent.
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  9. #19
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    Re: Radio & TV in Cuba

    Quote Originally Posted by cd637299
    David, if you are doing research, do ya think maybe you could sample 30 minutes of Reloj and give us a simple summary? That would be interesting, I'd think.
    I will give it a listen... my project is on behalf of a non-related entity, but another listen to Rebelde might be interesting.
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  10. #20
    nocomradio
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    Re: Radio & TV in Cuba

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    Quote Originally Posted by radiodxrichmond

    Smart idea! I'd love to read that as well...as a person who lived in South Florida for sometime, mentioning anything not negative about post-revolution Cuba is about as taboo as saying anything positive about Nazism to a crowded Isreali temple!
    Anecdote time.

    When I consulted WQBA around 1970, and later when I managed WHTT in 80-82 we had lists of euphemisms for Fidel Castro, as mentioning him by name was not considered good form.

    Among the (translated) substitutes for his name were things like The Traitor of the Americasl The Assassin of Cuba, and The Hangman. In all, there were like a dozen that rotated in use.

    And music that was playable one day might all be pulled the next if the artist did a concert in Cuba or said something nice about Fidel.

    Of course, since I knew people whose parents had been killed in front of their eyes when they were still children by the Castro henchmen, I was pretty understanding towards the strong feelings. In fact, one of my news people had spent time in the horrible prison, Combinado del Este, where dissidents were sent.


    My wife, who is from South America, has many relatives who are from various parts of Latin America, and in particular one cousin who is originally from Cuba. He was forced to leave Cuba as a young man of around 20 years old when after the revolution all of their land was taken by the Communist government. There, he had a good job and came from a family with some substantial real estate holdings. He came to the US, basically peniless, and had to work back up from nothing, which took many years of hard work to get where he is now. The mention of the name Castro still invokes some very, very strong emotions in him, even to this day. I can certainly understand his position.

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